Covid-19 patient diary, part 2: Centre of emergency medicine

1 min reading time

Taking antibiotic did not help to reduce fever and failed to improve my condition. Three doses of antibiotics later, on the 28th of March, my fever was around 40.0°C/104°F and then antipyretics suddenly stopped working — I tried different doses of paracetamol either alone or in combination with different doses of ibuprofen — no result. My cough worsened to the point that after a cough attack, which now happened also during the day, I could not breathe normally. Getting up from bed was close to impossible. Fever remained constant at 40.0°C/104°F.

Four doses of antibiotics later, on the 29th of March, I called the ambulance. Two major questions represented the most interest for paramedics: (1) do I already take antibiotics? and (2) what is my blood oxygen saturation? This time I did not disappoint them – blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) maxed out at 88%. My blood pressure was high (blood was “boiling” at around 40.0°C/104°F for the whole week). “You will come with us” — they told, I managed somehow to get up from bed, I barely could stand and then proceeded to the ambulance car. In the car, I got the oxygen mask connected to a gas reservoir and only after a paramedic used the pressure reducer to adjust the high-flow oxygen level I got a slight relief.

Next stop – Centre of Emergency Medicine. Oxygen mask, multiple vein and artery blood sampling complemented with intravenous cannula insertion. My blood tests confirmed my state, including: (1) muscle damage; (2) changes in pressure within heart compartment; (3) inflammation; (4) low level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D; (5) elevated ferritin level; and (5) thrombosis danger. The cannula then was used for dexamethasone injection (at around 13:30). Next, computed tomography (CT) scan — the “doughnut” scan. Couple hours of waiting... Then, I called the doctor and asked what was the diagnosis and the prognosis. He told that according to CT scan my lungs’ damage extent was 60–70% (opaqueness without fluid) — in other words, I had an unclassified bilateral viral pneumonia. He then added: “If you had come tomorrow, it might be too late for you”. That triggered mixed feelings in me...

To be continued ...